Workspace ONE Intelligence

casino online argentina mercadopago I struggle with concentration. I find it difficult to focus on more than one task at a time, and so in my case, Distraction = Low Productivity. One of the things I tend to struggle with is when there are multiple variables that need to be tracked at any one time.

I feel very sorry then, for IT admins who need to keep track of potentially thousands of different devices used by thousands of different users. They need a way to quickly understand what is happening with their devices, their applications and their users in real time.

In my previous post, I mentioned about the new security model called User and Entity Behaviour Analytics (UEBA). As a quick recap, UEBA marks a change in approach for security, as it allows enterprises to quickly analyse user activity to ensure that anything out of the ordinary is flagged up before the user can commit any malicious acts.

VMware’s Workspace ONE platform has been designed to allow management of all devices and applications from one place. It incorporates industry leading Unified Endpoint Management for everything from iPhones to Windows 10 devices, along with the ability to deliver virtualised Windows desktops and applications.

Workspace ONE bridges user experience across multiple ecosystems by using an integrated Identity Management solution.

All of this means that Workspace ONE is in a unique position to grab metrics from each user regarding their application usage, their devices, device context and session information. Nowhere else in an enterprise is there such a single platform which touches all users and devices. This is why VMware created Workspace ONE Intelligence, to make the most of this opportunity.

 

best casino slots in illinois What is Workspace ONE Intelligence?

The Workspace ONE platform consists of three key components:

  • Unified Endpoint Manager (previously AirWatch). This component enables the enterprise to control all deployed devices, and also grab key logs, metrics and real-time contextual values from these devices.
  • Identity Management. A central authentication point which grants access to all authorised services, including SaaS apps.
  • Virtual Windows Apps and Desktops. Windows apps still make up the majority of applications, so the platform offers industry-leading Windows apps and desktop delivery.

Now, imagine that these were three completely independent solutions, with various logs and data streams. Also imagine that you still had physical desktops and a legacy PCLM system to maintain. It would very quickly lead to an enormous amount of data to gather, store and analyse. The very idea of this makes me start to panic.

VMware has recognised the value of having a single access platform, and so Workspace ONE Intelligence now allows enterprises to put all access, device and applications information into a single data lake. This isn’t complex to set up or configure, as all of the information is readily available through the different components in the platform.

From the Endpoint Management side, we have access to device information, including hardware and software version, software installed, location and wifi info.

From the Identity Management perspective, we know when a user logged on, and also which applications they accessed. If we then add in virtual Windows apps and desktops, we have information capabilities that allow enterprises to know everything about user behaviour.

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online casino um echtes geld What can it do for you?

Let’s say, for instance, that you want a quick look at any security risks you may have across your devices. There is a report for that, listing such key principles as Compromised Devices, Encryption Status and Passcode:

VMware acquired Apteligent some time ago, and the innovative capabilities provided by that platform have been fully integrated into the Intelligence solution. With Apteligent, enterprises have the ability to get detailed application-centric information including crash reports, user behaviour and app performance. By adding the capabilities provided by Apteligent into Workspace ONE Intelligence, you can now get all of your user information in one location.

Another key report would be application launch count. This is very useful for helping an application team understand which applications are being utilised, across which platforms. Think about this in the context of application rationalisation. I’ve often spoken to organisations looking to reduce the number of applications they deploy to their end users. The ability to understand which applications are being used and how often is a very valuable metric for this exercise.

 

Another great example is the ability to quickly create a report to detect specific security risks or vulnerabilities. In the below example, a report has been created to list devices currently exposed to the Spectre vulnerability:

 

In this case, we’re simply looking at enrolled Android devices which have not been patched since May 2018:

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online casino mit paypal aufladen The really cool stuff: Automation

Workspace ONE Intelligence already incorporates many different metrics gleaned from the various components of the platform. Great, but what can we actually do with all of this information?

This is where automation comes in.

Let’s say that we have a number of older Dell laptops deployed around the enterprise, and that some of these are beginning to exhibit signs of an ageing battery. Battery age is determined by recharge cycles and general usage, so it’s not efficient to make sweeping generalisations about the general health of your laptop estate. With Workspace ONE Intelligence, you can actually gether data on battery health from your estate, and then use that information to trigger a service desk ticket to get the battery replaced. In this case then, the user could receive a replacement battery before they even realise that there is an issue with theirs. Kudos for the IT team!

 

The Future

VMware’s Trust Network enables enterprises to open up these capabilities across the VMware stack, offering integrations with other VMware security solutions, such as NSX and AppDefense, along with cutting edge security vendors such as Carbon Black. I’ll cover that in the next blog post.

Earlier this year, VMware acquired E8 security. E8 was a leading start up in the field of User and Entity Behaviour Analytics (UEBA). With the integration of E8’s technologies, Workspace ONE will offer the very best capabilities for enterprise end user security.

Watch out for another blog post when more information on UEBA becomes available.

 

 

Central Intelligence

There have been some frightening stats recently reporting how almost 50% of information security breaches involve internal users. We’re used to protecting against external threats, but now it looks like enterprises are being attacked from all sides.

How do we defend against an enemy that is already inside the gates? How do we keep a close eye on our own users, the vast majority of whom are have no ill intent?

This problem isn’t new, and there have been many interesting solutions over the centuries, most of them involving some form of surveillance.

Big Brother

In 1791, the social theorist Jeremiah Bentham came up with a revolutionary idea to ensure complete surveillance of prison inmates with a minimum of prison guards.

His innovation involved building all of the prison cells in an array around a central guard tower. The cells had open aspects to the tower, meaning that the inside of each cell was visible to the guard tower. The tower itself used opaque glass, meaning that guards could see all of the inmates’ activities, but the inmates couldn’t see the guards.

He called his design ‘ online casino bc canada The Panopticon‘.

British prisons in the 18th and 19th centuries were grim places. The prevailing sentiment was that prison was for punishment and deterrence, rather than rehabilitation. This meant that inmates were not inclined to behave themselves, and quite often prison facilities were dangerous places for both inmates and guards.

The Panopticon therefore provided two main benefits. Firstly, it allowed the monitoring of the prison population with many fewer guards than a traditional prison. Secondly, inmates would behave as if they were under constant observation, as they wouldn’t be able to tell where the guards were looking.

Ruins of a Panopticon-style prison, Cuba
By I, Friman
online casino in indian rupees The traditional view
By Simon Ledingham

The traditional way of thinking about IT security is to view the network and resources as a castle with strong outer walls and many layers of defence. However, a castle’s main job is to prevent enemies from gaining access to the riches stored inside.

Castle walls aren’t going to do much good if the enemy is already inside the gates. What’s the solution?

This is where we need to start thinking like a prison guard. Prison guards have a completely different perspective to sentries standing on the castle walls. Rather than watching to see if someone is trying to get in, they need to understand the people on the inside and know intimately what their usual behaviours and interactions look like.

Let’s look at the example of a major UK supermarket information security breach in 2014. In that instance, the payroll details of 100,000 users were uploaded to news agencies and sharing sites. The culprit had not done something that would have triggered traditional SIEM systems. He was a Senior Auditor, and therefore had full access to the systems he stole data from. A user accessing authorised systems isn’t going to trigger most security systems. This is evident from the fact that this activity was ongoing for four months!

However, let’s say that there was a central system that had visibility of his system access, along with an understanding of his usual habits and interactions. In that case, that system could flag up instantly that he was downloading 50GB of data, rather than the usual 50MB of data daily.

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Gartner has recently created a new category of information security it calls User and Entity Behaviour Analytics ( japan online casino license UEBA). By base lining user actions over a period of time, a UEBA-based solution can learn what normal behaviour for a user looks like. If the user then does something out of the ordinary, it will send an alert.

This is from Gartner:

online casino giving 120 free spins UEBA solutions use analytics to build the standard profiles and behaviors of users and entities (hosts, applications, network traffic and data repositories) across time and peer group horizons. Activity that is anomalous to these standard baselines is presented as suspicious, and packaged analytics applied on these anomalies can help discover threats and potential incidents. The most common use cases sought by enterprises are detecting malicious insiders and external attackers infiltrating their organizations (compromised insiders).

Where should a UEBA solution sit if it is to have maximum access to user activity? This is where we come back to the idea of Bentham’s Panopticon. The real innovation of this design was that the central tower had visibility of each inmate. The cells they were in was not an important factor. Indeed, an inmate could be in any cell, and this wouldn’t impact the functioning of the central tower.

apex8 online casino dealer hiring How a modern workspace helps

All of this leads nicely to the idea of a modern workspace (sometimes called a Digital Workspace) solution. With a true Digital Workspace solution, all application access is controlled via a single entity, usually an identity management solution. Once a user is authenticated against the identity manager, they are then granted onward access to other authorised systems. The applications delivered could be traditional Windows desktops or apps, mobile apps or SaaS apps. A record is then kept of that access.

User authentication and access in an important data point, but then so is their activity across various devices. For instance, a user may use mobile or desktop devices to access applications. They may use these devices in certain locations or at certain times. A Digital Workspace solution should be able to take all of these information points and build a model of the user. Any activity that doesn’t fit this model can then be flagged for further investigation.

Imagine if a UEBA solution had been in place during the supermarket incident. Potentially, the miscreant could have been caught and identified within minutes, meaning that the activity could have been stopped before any information policies were breached.

holland casino slots online The secure workspace

Apart from an aborted attempt in Cuba, the Panopticon as designed by Jeremiah Bentham was never built. It’s concepts though can be seen today with the ubiquitous use of CCTV.

Big data analytics and AI are giving us new ways to understand human psychology and motivations. I believe that EUC is becoming the most important security play in an enterprise, and the future of human / technology interactions will be about ensuring intuitive access with transparent security. The Digital Workspace is how these concepts are being brought together.

Stay tuned for the next exciting episode.

What’s all this about a Digital Workspace?

To be honest, I don’t like the term. It sounds dated, and reminds me of the time when everyone was showing off their ‘digital’ watches. Surely, all workspaces are ‘digital’ these days, in the sense of being electronically enabled. I prefer the term ‘modern’.

Whenever I think of a workspace, I think of a desk. Maybe that makes me old school. I’m trying not to give my age away here, but when I was in primary school, we had battered wooden desks that opened to allow you to store books, pens, ghostbusters lunch boxes, catapults, sweets and other contraband.
When someone mentions the ‘Digital Workspace’, I imagine that old school desk, but with maybe a digital alarm clock nailed into it like some sort of steampunk mash-up.

For centuries though, desks and tables have been the workspace. Onto this space we’d affix paper, pens, staplers, paper punches, paper clips photo frames and suchlike. No doubt you’ve seen the short video that shows how most of this desktop paraphernalia has been subsumed into a single device, usually a desktop or a tablet.

Great. I now have the ability to create documents, communicate, do my day job etc. etc. etc. from a single device. So this is my digital workspace, right?

Well, yes, it is. As long as you use Windows applications on a Windows platform, you’re all set.

Thanks for reading. Watch out for the next blog post.

Hold on a second though…

You won’t be surprised here, but I think there’s actually more to it than that. The reason is simple: ecosystems.

Enterprises are complex beasts. If you take one example, Dell Technologies (chosen at random, I promise), then here you have a truly huge entity that employs over 140,000 people across the globe. What’s more, all 140,000 staffers don’t just do one thing (make awesome tech), but they do a whole range of stuff, from researching tech, to designing it, building it, marketing it, selling it, financing it and supporting it. And then you need the support functions to ensure that all of these star players can do their job without hassle. You need HR, IT, Facilities and all the other business heroes to actually make it all work together.

Now, how likely is it that all of these people could continue to be awesome with just one application in their digital workspace? Imagine that every user had the same table, with the same stack of papers and writing implements. Would sales be just as effective using Office, but without a CRM? How about the IT team if they just had the Office suite to work with?

The truth is that most Enterprises need almost as many software packages as they have job roles, if not more in many cases. AND, we are no longer tied to just the traditional Windows platform. We have to consider Apple, Google, Linux and SaaS, along with Windows apps.

If I asked you to name a CRM, chances are that you’d shout ‘Salesforce’. If I asked you to name a HR tool, then you’d probably whisper ‘Workday’ or ‘Ciphr’. Productivity? That’s Office. Then there’s the whole galaxy of line-of-business apps for every job role imaginable. These probably aren’t Windows apps anymore, they’ll be web apps running in someone else’s datacenter, or mobile apps that connect to a cloud-based back end. It’s a bit like having multiple desks, with a discreet set of tools in each, with a different key to open each of them.

What if I want to use a Windows app on a Mac? How about getting Enterprise apps on my personal tablet? What if I work in a warehouse and need to use a rugged device?

And that, folks, is why a Digital Workspace isn’t as simple as using a laptop. And that’s before we even consider security and buying the device in the first place.

A real Modern Workspace needs to be able to bind all of these services together, while at the same time making them seamless to use and access. Milking the desk analogy to the very last, it’s like having all of the tools for your job in the desk, next to your sweets. It’s a bit like shrinking the rest of the office into your personal, customised, foldable desk, and then not requiring you to walk around to grab important things. It’s all there, ready to go, locked with a key that only you have access to. And the real beauty here is that you can take it with you, or even swap to a completely different desk, with all your tools right there where they should be.

On the train, in the office or on the beach, you can no longer escape work. The future is the Modern Workspace 🙂

The Epic Journey to the Modern Workspace

The last time I worked consistently in an office was way back in 2011, and I can tell you that I didn’t like it one bit.

It wasn’t so much the job itself (though that contributed), it was the traffic on the commute, the lack of a decent sandwich shop and the constant disputes over the thermostat.

Since 2012, I’ve been a ‘Road Warrior’, which means I still have to brave awful traffic conditions, eat ‘food’ from service stations (just try to spot a non-cheese-based sandwich in Starbucks or Costa) and now own a range of coats based on how far North I’m travelling.

But I love it.

The reason is, when I’m not travelling, I work from home. No traffic, a choice of freshly frozen food and central heating.
I’m not alone in preferring to work outside the office. If recent stats are anything to go by then this trend is about to explode. In 2016, GlobalWorkplaceAnalytics estimated that up to 25% of the US workforce teleworks at some frequency, while up to 90% stated that they would like to telework at least part time.

We take it for granted; work means traveling somewhere else to be productive. For certain tasks, such as manufacturing or hospitality, this commute is inevitable. For a vast of chunk of workers though, travelling to an office to work is simply a holdover from earlier times. It’s justified with terms such as ‘collaboration’, ‘team work’ or ‘profile’, but in reality, there is no productivity gain from being in the office.

In fact, Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics at Stanford University, conducted an experiment that demonstrated a 13% increase in productivity from home workers when compared to their office-based colleagues. Part of this increase was put down to the home environment being quieter and more conducive to work, and also the decrease in sick days from working in a less stressful environment.

Why do so many of us still work in offices? As the man said: “We have the technology”, so why hasn’t this technology set us free from the tyranny of the office? Where does this holdover come from?

I have a theory, and it involves history. I love history.

nj online casino promo codes Welcome to the machine

You may have seen the huge brick buildings in the UK’s industrial heartlands which have over the years been converted into hip new apartments, trendy spas and hippy communes.
These buildings once served a purpose; they were mills. In these mills, workers toiled away day after day, working machines to spin yarn and create textiles. Conditions were poor, pay was poor and work / life balance was non-existent.


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This was all a consequence of the Industrial Revolution, and in particular, a set of innovations designed to increase productivity.

Under the previous Domestic System, textile workers were home-based to a large extent, spinning yarn and making cloth. This enabled a lot of flexibility for workers to fit their work around their other commitments.

The year 1764 heralded the start of automation in industry, starting with the Spinning Jenny. This innovation, and its successors, enabled hordes of low-paid, low-skilled workers to create textiles and made the Domestic System obsolete. Instead, those who could afford to created huge buildings filled with low-skilled workers to operate these machines.


usa online casino no deposit bonus The Spinning Jenny

The economic viability of these new mill businesses was based on access to a large pool of cheap labour. To facilitate this, mill owners built rows of cheap, high density housing next to their mills to house their workers. People almost literally began living where they worked.

Within 100 years of the Spinning Jenny, the entire social and economic landscape of the United Kingdom had changed, mill towns dotted the landscape and there had been a huge migration to these new towns.
This was the start of the modern model of working: Workers commuted to the mill, and operated a machine to be productive. They could not be productive away from that location or that machine.

Fast forward to the late 20th century, and the mills were replaced with huge glass boxes full of people: Offices.

In these offices, workers toil away day after day at PCs to fill in spreadsheets or operate LOB apps. Conditions are good, pay is good, but work / life balance is still tricky for reasons i.e. the commute, sandwiches and thermostat.

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Now you may argue that the mills simply evolved into more modern factories, and that the office is merely the new environment for clerical workers. That’s true after a fashion, except that as industrialisation drove the urban landscape of the 18th and 19th century, the creation of forests of skyscrapers and office blocks are the mark of today’s modern city. The majority of workers in the UK now work in an office environment. The office is the spiritual successor to the mill.

The machines that workers use have also evolved, from the humble quill in the 17th and 18th centuries, through to the typewriter, the Apple II and the PC. These have been huge leaps in technological innovation, leading Social Historians to dub this time we live in as the Information Age. It is now possible to work from home, from a café or even while sitting on a beach.

But from a working perspective, have things really changed so much from the Industrial Revolution?
Think about it. The majority of the workforce still travel to a single location, they still sit at a designated desk, and they still work at a dedicated machine. Yes, that machine is a miracle of modern manufacture and innovation, but it is still just a machine for manipulating data.

What will it take to break this stranglehold of the office being a location that must be worked in? Does it require a change in culture, technology or both? What is the future of the workspace?

We’ll take a look at these questions in later articles.

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